Posts Tagged ‘ontology management’

Ontology Management for the Semantic Web, Semantic Web Services, and Business Applications (Springer)

January 15, 2008

bookcoverManaging ontologies and annotated data throughout their life-cycles is at the core of semantic systems of all kinds. Ontology Management, an edited volume by senior researchers in the field, provides an up-to-date, concise and easy-to-read reference on this topic.

This book volume describes relevant tasks, practical and theoretical challenges, limitations and methodologies, plus available software tools. The editors discuss integrating the conceptual and technical dimensions with a business view on using ontologies, by stressing the cost dimension of ontology engineering and by providing guidance on how up-to-date tooling helps to build, maintain, and use ontologies. Also included is a one-stop reference on all aspects of managing ontological data and best practices on ontology management for a number of application domains.

Ontology Management is designed as a reference or secondary text for researchers and advanced-level students studying semantic systems, Semantic Web Services (SWS) and Web Services, information systems, data and knowledge engineering, and the Semantic Web in general. Practitioners in industry will find this work invaluable as well.

Hepp, M., De Leenheer, P., de Moor, A., and Sure, Y. (eds.) Ontology Management for the Semantic Web, Semantic Web Services, and Business Applications. Springer Series “Semantic Web and Beyond: Computing for Human Experience” . ISBN: 978-0-387-69899-1, November 2007.

Community-driven Evolution of Knowledge-intensive Systems

November 26, 2007

De Leenheer, P. and Meersman, R. (2007) Towards Community-driven Evolution of Knowledge-intensive Systems. In Proc. of the 6th Int’l Conf. on Ontologies, DataBases, and Applications of Semantics (ODBASE 2007) (Vilamoura, Portugal), LNCS, Springer

Co-evolution in a knowledge-intensive community

Co-evolution in a knowledge-intensive community

This article wants to address the need for a research effort and framework that studies and embraces the novel, difficult but crucial issues of adaptation of knowledge resources to their respective user communities, and \emph{vice versa}, as a fundamental property within knowledge-intensive internet systems. Through a deep understanding of real-time community-driven evolution of so-called ontologies, a knowledge-intensive system can be made operationally relevant and sustainable over longer periods of time. To bootstrap our framework, we adopt and extend the DOGMA ontology framework, and its community-grounded ontology engineering methodology DOGMA-MESS, with an ontology that models community concepts such as business rules, norms, policies, and goals as first-class citizens of the ontology evolution process. Doing so ontology evolution can be tailored to the needs of a particular community. Finally, we illustrate with an example from an actual real-world problem setting, viz. interorganisational exchange of HR-related knowledge.

T-Lex: a Role-based Ontology Engineering Tool

November 19, 2006

Trog, D., Vereecken, J., Christiaens, S., De Leenheer, P., and Meersman, R. (2006) T-Lex: a Role-based Ontology Engineering Tool. In Proc. of the On The Move to Meaningful Internet Systems Workshops (OTM2006) (Montpelier, France) , LNCS 4278, Springer, pp. 1191-1200.

In the DOGMA ontology engineering approach ontology construction starts from a (possibly very large) uninterpreted base of elementary fact types called lexons that are mined from linguistic descriptions (be it from existing schemas, a text corpus or formulated by domain experts). An ontological commitment to such ”lexon base” means selecting/reusing from it a meaningful set of facts that approximates well the intended conceptualization, followed by the addition of a set of constraints, or rules, to this subset. The commitment process is inspired by the fact-based database modeling method NIAM/ORM2, which features a recently updated, extensive graphical support. However, for encouraging lexon reuse by ontology engineers a more scalable way of visually browsing a large Lexon Base is important. Existing techniques for similar semantic networks rather focus on graphical distance between concepts and not always consider the possibility that concepts might be (fact-) related to a large number of other concepts. In this paper we introduce an alternative approach to browsing large fact-based diagrams in general, which we apply to lexon base browsing and selecting for building ontological commitments in particular. We show that specific characteristics of DOGMA such as grouping by contexts and its ”double articulation principle”, viz. explicit separation between lexons and an application’s commitment to them can increase the scalability of this approach. We illustrate with a real-world case study.
In Collibra, the T-lex  plugin has been further extended in the Collibra Workbench to visualise business semantics engineering.