Posts Tagged ‘HRM’

Dynamically Serving Long Tail Needs in the Global Digital (Education) Market

June 21, 2011

Mass connectivity between customers and suppliers on the Web transforms business from a transaction-based (or product-oriented) practice to a long-term relationship-based (or service-oriented) practice.

An example. Before we bought a car as a product: once the transaction (Car for money) was made, the car becomes your possession and you are responsible to take care of all services (like tax and insurance) you need to get the car on the road. Value was created at the point of transaction. Today, like with leasing, a car becomes never really you property: you rather consider it as a service that enables you to “move around freely”. Value is created of a much longer time: as long as you use the “car service” you evaluate the added value and feed back to the supplier so it can be improved.

When implementing technologies to support service-based market places, we must take into account economic relationships rather than work flow properties; and rethink the whole concept of value to start with. Indeed the business model of these new market places are centered around the notion of value; hence it is relevant to semantically codify “who is offering what of value to whom” and what is expected of value in return. Where before value was a simple “price”, it now includes a lot of dimensions (fed by social Web data like reputation, ratings, etc.) along the life cycle of a service. Another problem is that most interesting needs, those along the long tail, can usually not be immediately served because (i) no single supplier offers it by default; and (ii) as it is too niche, multiple suppliers have to assess ROI first and co-create accordingly.

Needs in the head (red part) of the tail are usually offered by vertically integrated service providers. Needs in the long tail are typically more complex requiring niche offerings offered by a combination of suppliers (picture by Bart Van De Casteel) .

Determining needs and offerings is not a one-pass exercise. To match them up they have to grow towards each other through compromise and sacrifice of all parties.  Therefore, we propose an interactive dialogue system to express customer needs based on marketing theory (see e.g. Philip Kotler and Kevin Keller. Marketing Management. Prentice Hall, 2006). In addition, we also provide capabilities to publish service offerings by means of an ontology-based catalog. Moreover, since mass configuration of products is playing an important role, dynamic composition of SVNs has been also supported. Finally, our long-term ultimate goal is to automatically compose a SVN, including the required business processes and Information Technology (IT) support in the form of web services. Such IT is then aligned with the business, since both are designed in an integrated way.

Razo-Zapata, I.; De Leenheer, P.; Gordijn, J.; Akkermans, H. (2011) Service Value Networks for Competency-driven Educational Services: a Case Study. In Proceedings of the 6th international Workshop on Business / IT alignment and Interoperability (CAiSE 2011), Springer LNBIP

Business Semantics Management in Competency-centric HRM

September 9, 2010

The article in Journal of Computers for Industry is finally available here.

Business Semantics Management: a Case Study for Competency-centric HRM

January 16, 2009

In this article we introduce a novel approach and tool for fact-oriented business semantics management that is inspired by agile design methods. We demonstrate and validate it in a realistic case study that was carried out within the European Codrive project. Codrive’s vision was to contribute to more meaningful competency-centric human resource management. Key challenges are the uniform publication of unambiguous competency information and “time-to-competency” agility. To this end, we developed a shared and formal knowledge representation of competency domains. Stakeholders include educational institutes, public employment organisations, and industry partners from different European countries. The resulting Vocational Competency Ontology wanted to provide a candidate best practice for engineering a community-shared and reusable semantic pattern base that can be applied by all stakeholders to semantically reconcile their contextualised competency models.businesssemanticsmanagement De Leenheer, P., Christiaens, S., and Meersman, R. (2009) Business Semantics Management: a Case Study for Competency-centric HRM. In Journal of Computers in Industry: Special Issue about Semantic Web Computing in Industry. Elsevier, forthcoming

Business Use Case: Ontologising Competencies in an Interorganisational Setting

January 16, 2008

In this book chapter, we summarise findings from Codrive, a large-scale ontology project in the vocational training domain. This specific competency area is complex, and in order to achieve proper interoperability, all involved stakeholders must participate in interorganisational ontology engineering. In particular, this chapter illustrates the DOGMA-MESS methodology, a community-driven approach to ontology management. It presents practical experiences for the issues addressed in the previous chapters, complementingthem with illustrative data and hands-on knowledge.

Christiaens, S., De Leenheer, P., de Moor, A., Meersman, R. (2008) Business Use Case: Ontologising Competencies in an Interorganisational Setting. In Ontology Management: Semantic Web, Semantic Web Services, and Business Applications, from Semantic Web and Beyond: Computing for Human Experience, eds. Hepp, M.; De Leenheer, P.; de Moor, A.; Sure, Y., Springer

Community-driven Evolution of Knowledge-intensive Systems

November 26, 2007

De Leenheer, P. and Meersman, R. (2007) Towards Community-driven Evolution of Knowledge-intensive Systems. In Proc. of the 6th Int’l Conf. on Ontologies, DataBases, and Applications of Semantics (ODBASE 2007) (Vilamoura, Portugal), LNCS, Springer

Co-evolution in a knowledge-intensive community

Co-evolution in a knowledge-intensive community

This article wants to address the need for a research effort and framework that studies and embraces the novel, difficult but crucial issues of adaptation of knowledge resources to their respective user communities, and \emph{vice versa}, as a fundamental property within knowledge-intensive internet systems. Through a deep understanding of real-time community-driven evolution of so-called ontologies, a knowledge-intensive system can be made operationally relevant and sustainable over longer periods of time. To bootstrap our framework, we adopt and extend the DOGMA ontology framework, and its community-grounded ontology engineering methodology DOGMA-MESS, with an ontology that models community concepts such as business rules, norms, policies, and goals as first-class citizens of the ontology evolution process. Doing so ontology evolution can be tailored to the needs of a particular community. Finally, we illustrate with an example from an actual real-world problem setting, viz. interorganisational exchange of HR-related knowledge.